The Warradjan Cultural Centre

Situated one kilometre outside of Cooinda Lodge in the heart of Kakadu, the Warradjan Cultural Centre provides visitors with an insight into the Aboriginal history of the area, sharing age-old stories and traditions that have been passed down from generation to generation.

Warradjan Cultural Centre

The centre itself is named after Warradjan, the pig-nosed turtle, and provides visitors with the chance to get an insight into the Aboriginal tribes who have lived in Kakadu and the surrounding regions for thousands and thousands of years.

The on-site selection of displays include numerous artefacts that help illustrate the stories that the traditional owners of Kakadu and its surrounding regions have wanted to share with visitors for thousands of years.

Hunting for History at the Warradjan Aboriginal Cultural Centre

Inside, you’ll find a mixture of contemporary display techniques, including interactive videos, images, and real-life artefacts that delve into both personal stories from individual members of the surrounding tribes and collective histories that span thousands of years.

Joining together, the people from Murumburr, Mirrar Gun-djeihmi, Badmardi, Bunitj, Girrimbitjba, Manilakarr, Wargol and other tribes have created a fascinating exhibit that highlights the most important parts of Aboriginal culture and history in this part of the country.

In one part of the exhibition, there are several displays that feature different hunting techniques that have been used by the clans over many years, while another shows the natural history of the park. Elsewhere, you’ll find exhibits on the blood lines of the local people and marriage rights, as well as a selection of stories from elders and the effect that white settlement in the Top End of Australia has had on the Aboriginal tribes.

Our Land is Our Life

One of the major exhibits, ‘Our Land is Our Life’, covers the hunting techniques used by the Aboriginal people in the region in different seasons. As well as being able to see the tools and videos showing the activity in action, you can also learn about the history of the park as well as the blood-lines and marriage rights of the local people.

To top it off, there are tribal elder stories that are woven into the history and a selection of stunning displays to keep you occupied.

Come Look and Feel Our Culture

In another part of the centre, the gallery ‘Come Look and Feel Our Culture’ gives you the opportunity to understand the Warradjan Centrehistory and plights of traditional land owners in the region.

Once you’ve explored the range of different exhibits, you can check out the on-site gallery that showcases arts and crafts from Kakadu and the surrounding Arnhem Land and Katherine regions. Most of the art on show at the Warradjan Cultural Centre has been produced by local artists, some of which date back many years, while others represent the culture that pervades in the region today.

In the gallery shop at the end of the centre you can pick up a present or two, all of which have been handmade and produced by local artists in the area. Things like didgeridoos, paintings, books, and cards all offer the perfect souvenir for friends and family back home.

The Centre is open from 9am to 5pm every day and is close to Cooinda Lodge and the famous Yellow Water Billabong.

The Aboriginal tribes that continue to reside in the region have been a major part in creating and nurturing the rich heritage that imbues the soil and surrounding landscape. At the Warradjan Cultural Centre, you can learn all about the Bininj Culture and discover the important role of the tribes within the landscape. As well as a fascinating array of exhibits that cover everything from personal stories to dreamtime narratives and local laws, you can check out the on-site art gallery and the gift shop, where you can pick up a souvenir or two to remember your time in the region.

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