How much does a Kakadu park fee cost?

Kakadu National Park is like nowhere else on Earth.

Kakadu National Park Sunset

It is a gigantic, otherworldly dreamworld of towering falls, endless tropical views, croc-filled swamps and Indigenous culture. A trip to Kakadu is a must for anyone venturing to the top end, as it is an unforgettable, surreal experience for the senses!

Whether you’re taking in the incredible views and ancient Indigenous rock art at Nourlangie shelter, marvelling at the giant Jim Jim Falls or watching prehistoric salties in their swampy element, Kakadu is a mesmerising land and one that has to be seen to be believed.

Park pass prices vary from the dry to wet season, with pricing as follows:

Dry season (15 May – 31 October)

Adults (16 & over): $40

Children (5 – 15 years): $20

Family (2 adults & 2 or more children): $100

Concession: $30

Wet season (1 November – 14 May)

Adults: $25

Children: $12.50

Family: $65

Concession: $19

Naturally, given the higher pricing the dry season is when Kakadu is at its most accessible. This being said, the park is thrilling to visit at every time of the year, and the wet season could be ideal if you’re not afraid of a tropical storm rolling in on your trip!

So, now that we’ve got pricing out of the way, here are some of the top experiences in Kakadu, and why it’s such an incredible national treasure.

  • Go croc-spotting on Yellow Water

    Kakadu National Park is home to one of Australia’s largest resident crocodile populations – they just simply seem to be everywhere! But the best (and safest) way to see these magnificent beasts is via a Yellow Water cruise. Here, a knowledgeable guide will teach you about these prehistoric predators, their mannerisms and their Jurassic lineage!

  • Swim the Gunlom infinity pool

    Infinity pools have become a luxury design trend in recent years. Hotels from Singapore to New York proudly boast their infinity pools to Insta-loving travellers, making out that they were the invention of some architectural wunderkind. But infinity pools have existed in nature for millions of years, including that of Kakadu’s incredible swimming spot. Gaze out over the magnificent expanse as you swim in nature’s answer to Singapore’s Marina Bay Sands – it’s a truly special part of the world.

  • See ancient rock art at Nourlangie shelter

    The Nourlangie shelter doesn’t only offer incredible panoramic views of the national park, but also multiple ancient Indigenous rock art sites. Gaze upon works that have existed for thousands of years, created by locals who used the site for shelter in the wet season.

Related article: How to get to Kakadu National Park

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